The First Episode!

by Dr. Sheila Pope

It finally happened. The first episode of my television show, “Conversations with Dr. Pope” finally aired on Houston Media Source Television. I filmed the footage at Worthing High School on August 18, 2018 during their Second Annual Southside Takeover Parade. I was lucky enough to work on creating and helping to organize the very first parade with Peoples United Summit. 

I was also a former English teacher at Worthing High School. I put in so much time at Worthing High School those three years, I would shut the building down. Literally, I left when the janitors left. I got to know the community well because I attended games and everything else they had at the school. I was immersed. I was determined to have my students show improvement on the English II exam. They did! We had the highest growth rate out of all of the areas tested on STAAR that year. However, that was not enough to move the school from the Improvement Required list.

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Filming My First Production

Worthing had been on the Improvement Required list for six consecutive years. TEA was threatening to shut them down and the HISD School District down due to low performance on STAAR.  However, in August of 2018, Worthing students turned it around. They performed well enough to move from the IR list to Met Standards.

 

I wanted to celebrate their success and talk to the people who serve Worthing High School. I was so blessed to have 10 people share their time with me on that extremely hot day. Some of the people who stopped and had a conversation with me were local officials: Commissioner Rodney Ellis, Wanda Adams, HISD Board of Trustee, Judson Robinson II, President & CEO of Houston Area Urban League, and State Representative Shawn Thierry. Mr. Allen Provost, Treasurer of Peoples United Summit and administrator at Worthing and Bryan Tigner, Math Instructor and Kappa League Sponsor at Worthing also took time out from their duties to have a conversation with me. I honored to interview three of my former students too.

Making the transition from educator to community leader was awesome. Making the transition to television producer was scary. Yet it felt so natural. I am glad my first production was created at Worthing High School! I love the students and the staff. I felt at home. It was familiar. I could make mistakes and laugh at myself and my guests were nice to me. I was so busy, I forgot to get photos with my guests. Luckily David Janise took a picture of me interviewing State Representative Shawn Thierry. It is the only photo I have of me filming! My hair was not camera ready, but I did not let it stop me. I wore my hat my mother gave me and move forward with my plan. The parade would not wait for me and it only happens once a year. As a producer, I realized I had to seize the moment.

Filming took two hours, checking out equipment two hours (drive and planning), and editing took days.  I worked on editing in my home office, at McDonald’s, and other places. My video had too much light throughout the video. I had to work some magic during the editing process.  Then, uploading all of the data took time. I had to add tags, titles, and purchase license for music. I made sure I had my guest sign media release consents. I worked so hard to make sure my work reflected me and made my guests look their best.

After all of the effort, I was able to have my first show air on Houston Media Source. It was great to see my show’s name on the schedule. It was awesome to watch it on television. I was fantastic to read my program schedule. I am so glad I became a producer. Thanks to Houston Media Source, Mayor Sandra Massie Hines and Allen Provost my dreams are now a reality. I will continue to get better and grow!

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Conversations with Dr. Pope Air Dates & Times for http://www.hmstv.org

After all of my hard work in August 2018, my showed premiered on September 11, 2018! The dream was real. I waited until the show aired two times before I uploaded it to YouTube. I swear it two days to upload it to YouTube. Here it is Link to watch it!

 

 

 

No Talking! Just Do it!

By Dr. Sheila Pope

One year ago, I moved into my first office. My friend Michelle and I celebrated. Now, I am working from my home office and shifting my visions and focus. My business address has changed and so have I. I am my brand; I do not have limits, except for those that exist in my mind. My faith in God has expanded and my focus on ways to generate revenue for others and my businesses have become more focused and strategic!

I am amazed at how much change has taken place since I took these photos a year ago! I am grateful for all of the support, lessons learned, and the mindset changes I have had in the two years since I have been a full-time entrepreneur. My clients have taught me so much about conducting business with integrity.

Michelle and I Celebrating

The View

Our Chats!

Thanks to State Representative Shawn Thierry, I realized I am a Community Leader. I never heard someone else address me in that term. I am normally called an educator. I have transitioned into another arena! I have served children, seniors, and community organizations in Sunnyside for four years. As a small business owner, Precinct 12 Chair in Brazoria County, and advocate, I have advocated for students at Worthing, TSU, Capella University, and I have advocated for senior citizens.

I have attended community meetings, political events and conventions (Democrat), graduations, served on Boards of outstanding nonprofits such as Smaart Incubator and Junior Achievers and Sunnyside Silver Hair Senior Group, Inc. I have served as a community partner with the Peoples United Summit and I founded the Boss Ladies Professional Network.

My latest transformation into a television producer of Conversations With Dr. Pope is the result of years of listening, watching, sharing, working with other people, and understanding there is a need to tell the stories of those no one else sees as valuable. I want people to see what I see as I do the work in the community.

From the time I launched into full-time entrepreneurship, I became a full-time community and business leader. It all happened while I was actively doing the work! Here is the shocking part, I never saw my evolution because I was living it not talking about it.

Conversations with Dr. Pope Next Episode

By Sheila Pope

I met with my next guests, Reginald Guillory and his wife Millie to plan the two-part series. During the first episode, we will discuss criminal justice reform, the re-entry process, and patterns of criminal behavior in families. I am the founder and CEO of The Next Move Re-entry Program 501c3 These issues are heart issues for me. I hope my work will shine a positive light on the experiences of ex-offenders and provide some resources for those in need of help.

During the second episode, we will meet and have a conversation with women who love and support ex-offenders. We will explore their choices to love ex-offenders and the cost they often pay to love their mates. More professional women are living with, married, it dating ex-offenders. We want to explore their rationale for taking the leap.

We hope both episodes of @Conversations with Dr. Pope will help our audience gain valuable information about the struggles and successes of ex-offenders and the women who love and support them.
If your company would like to sponsor the episodes, please contact us at: 832.633.8304

popesresourcecenter@gmail.com

New Author Added to Media Division of My Company

By Sheila Pope

I am excited to announce Boss Lady Toni Anderson and I have partnered to write a book together! She signed with my publishing company, Pope’s Resource Center, LLC. I love partnering with Boss Ladies to support our individual goals as well as our common business goals!

Toni Anderson Signed with Popes’ Resource Center, LLC

Source Pexels.com

The Producer

By Dr. Sheila Pope

I took time from editing my client’s dissertations to learn how to become a Producer via Houston Media Source. I took the first step by completing the orientation. I plan to have my own series soon. During orientation, I met two new fierce Boss Ladies in the process! The two young ladies were: Spoken word artist, Ebony Rose and business owner Tiffany Nicole.

Tiffany was the tall, beautiful version of myself! While I am was telling her about the Boss Ladies, she was on her phone requesting to join the group.

Who are Boss Ladies? Boss Ladies are a group of female small business owners who share information about the challenges and the benefits of running a small business. We support and encourage each others.

During the touring part of the orientation, I kept saying to Ebony, “I know you”. I kept wondering where I had met Tiffany too. During our exchange, I immediately recognized, Ebony’s power and confidence. I listened while Tiffany praised Ebony’s talent. In Boss Ladies, we celebrate each other’s gifts, accomplishments, and events. Ebony did not boast about her poetry skills, but I could see she knew she was great! I told her to own it. I do not believe women should down play their talents.

I was so excited to see their hustle in the parking lot. They were lining up their sponsors to become producers and so was I. They were thinking and doing some next-level hustling! I was doing the same thing. We all were working on our plans.

Also, during the orientation, Tiffany asked about the Houston Media Source’s Radio Program. I plan to have a radio shows too. Both of them planned to use public access television to promote their talent and their businesses.

There are three main goals of Boss Ladies. We promote, support, and encourage female business owners. When I started Boss Ladies, I did not ask for any membership dues or charge advertising fees. However, this month we are changing. I want to grow the group and expand our activities.

Special moments like meeting Ebony Rose and Tiffany Nicole remind me of the reasons I created Boss Ladies. As a small business owner, I have experienced great highs and so serious lows. Yet I am moving forward because of encounters like this.

I had a serious business matter that was weighing heavily on my mind during orientation. While I was trying to figure out how I was going to raise money to keep my office space, thinking of ways to use television, and trying to decide if it was time to have a radio program, God was lining up my appointed time to meet two Boss Ladies like myself. I am looking forward to my new adventure in television production.


The Green Room

The Editing Room

Serving Senior Citizens Over 60 in Sunnyside with Mayor of Sunnyside Sandra Massie Hines

by Dr. Sheila Pope

I have loved working with senior citizens for most of my life because of Zeffie Lee Frazier, my aunt, who took care of me while my parents worked. While my cousins Lorraine Joseph, Charlie Mae, and Joann Smith were at school, I was with Muh (Zeffie).

My days were filled with activities. I watched the Edge of Night. I collected the eggs out of the hen house. I ate homemade biscuits and drank coffee at the age of six. I think Muh was around 50 when I was six. Muh’s love and nurturing shielded me from my mother’s and father’s dysfunctional relationship. Muh helped me figure out who I was as a child and as a woman. I thought I was white for a year or two because of my complexion and my long hair (Lol!).

When I was 16, I returned to Winnfield. Louisiana. I would sit on the front porch with Uncle Charlie and Muh and tell them my dreams. I know they were over 65 at the time. I was ambitious at a young age. She believed me. On our many fishing trips, she had me drive her and Alice to go fishing. Alice and Muh we well over sixty and very independent. I dumped spit jars filled with Snuff.

My first job was in Winnfield, Lousiana at Troy’s Supermarket. Muh’s encouraged me to apply for the job. She explained to me why it was important for people to work for a living. She was my first cheerleader. I am not sure when dementia started to steal memories of me from Muh but I never lost my memories of her and my childhood.

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I have advocated for senior citizens because of the love and kindness I received from a senior citizen named Zeffie Frazier. People do not know, I fought for seniors like Marie Johnson from Acres Homes and for the ladies over 55 who worked in the kitchen over at Spring Branch Hospital before I became a teacher. Those ladies almost died from the stress and phsycial requirements of working in a hot industrial sized kitchen. Working with those senior citizens made me respect the value of a college degree. I was not designed to wash dishes in a hospital kitchen. I washed those dishes long enough for me to get to know each of ladies I was assigned to help. I was able to help them obtain their disability, helped one retire (hospital tried to fire her), and helped them obtain their social security. I even learned how to help one senior obtain her widow’s benefits.

I was never paid with money. I gained knowledge of how government systems worked. I learned literacy was critical. Many of the seniors I helped could not read. I learned I was smart and could do more by myself than I thought. After advocating for the seniors at Spring Branch, I thought I was going to become a lawyer. I became an educator instead. I still wonder how those seniors worked in the kitchen for 20 years.

I am sharing my story because the Mayor of Sunnyside, Sandra Massie Hines helped me to refocus my vision. She reminded me that money is not everything. She reminded me that I have a greater calling and God will order my steps to do more than I have ever thought. I woke up ready to continue my passion to do what I am called to do in business and in the Sunnyside community serving children and senior citizens.

Ms. Sandra Massie Hines and Harris County Sheriff Department

You are Appreciated!

God has partnered me with two community leaders in Sunnyside: Mr. Allen Provost, Treasurer of Peoples United Summit and Mayor Sandra Massie Hines, founder of Junior Achievers and Sunnyside Silver Hair Senior Group, Inc so I can stay focused and walk by faith to serve senior citizens and children while I continue to build my businesses.

I want to encourage each my readers to listen to your inner voice to help giuide you do the thing you know you are called to do in business and in the community. I want you to know serving others and volunteering are underrated. Being happy, helping others, and being at peace is priceless.

Time is Up!

by Dr. Sheila Pope

I love Netflix’s documentaries on the fashion world. I love to see how someone becomes the “it” of the fashion world. I love to see the mental struggles it takes for the fashion designers to rise above the competition to become super human. One day, I ran across

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Netflix’s “Inside British Vogue” and found it to be very interesting because of the editor-in-chiefs’ longevity at British Vogue. At the time of the documentary, Alexandra Shulman had been the editor-in-chief for 25 years. Alexandra relied on the magazine’s fashion director, Lucinda Chambers to help her manage Vogue. Lucinda Chambers had been at the British Vogue for 31 years at the time of filming. Alexandra and Lucinda’s longevity at a company is almost unheard of in any industry. I love learning from powerful women in any industry. However, I think I respect female CEOs in fashion industry because their creations impact people’s choices in their style and the way they present themselves to the world.

The filmaker, Richard Macer, followed the Editor-in-chief, Alexandra Shulman, and her staff around for nine months. During the filming, the cameras captured how several powerful women in the fashion industry made things happen. More important, they captured how the elite and those traveling in the circles of the elite behaved. While interviewing Lucinda Chambers about her time at the magazine, Lucinda’s comments jarred me. First, she said a few negative, but honest, things about the fashion industry.

Lucinda Chambers

Lucinda Chambers, former fashion director of British Vogue.

Lucinda Chambers admitted people did not need all of the stuff the fashion industry pushed on consumers. She explained how she would never be able to leave the magazine on her own. She said someone would have to let her go because she was unable to make the choice herself. Finally, in a bold statement, she clarified that she knew one day someone would tell her that her time was up.

After watching the documentary, I decided to follow Alexandra Shulman on Instagram. I discovered she had been replaced after 25 years by Edward Enninful. Then, I read

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Times Running Out!

Lucinda Chambers was fired in one conversation that took less than three minutess. “A month and a half ago I was fired from Vogue,” she says. “It took them three minutes to do it. I didn’t leave. I was fired” (Young, 2017).

Lucinda Chambers was furious about the way the she was told her time was up. She spoke out in the media and was pressured to recant her story about the firing. After 36 years at company, her career ended in three minutes! It is sad, but it does not take long to end someone else’s career. Lucinda Chambers knew the day would come when she would be shown the door, but when it came she was not ready. She was furious. To be honest, I was perplexed at her response. Was she angry over how it was done or was she angry that it was done? She admitted on camera that she had stayed past her time. Sometimes leaders give too much of their personal and professional lives to other peoples’ company.

Business People hangout together at coffee shop

Everyone Knows Your Business

Moreover, I was shocked that Mrs. Chambers thought no one from upper management was aware she was going to be fired. After working with everyone so closely, maybe she felt someone in her circle would have given her a heads up. I have found people will always protect their own livelyhood first. After working in fashion for 31 years, you would think she would have known this too.

I wrote about Lucinda Chambers because she is a woman that I felt so many emotions about regarding business. I respected her dedication to British Vogue, but I questioned if I could give 31 years of my life to someone else’s vision, someone else’s company; I realized I could not do it today. However, 10 years ago, I would have considered retiring from a school district. I understand the power that comes from working for a company like Vogue. I can understand Lucinda Chambers’ desire to stay on well past her time. I understand how easy it is to think your loyality equates to earning the company’s loyality. After reading the article and watching the documentary, I really understand that when you know your time is up, you need to leave before they ask you.

Reference
, S. “Fired British Vogue fashion director slams magazine she worked at for 3 decades, says she hasn’t ‘read Vogue in years” July 4, 2017.